Monday, August 27, 2007

What is this Fruit-Flavored Beverage?



* For statistics on whether you actually call this "soda" or not, plot your place of origin on this map:

9 comments:

Disco Mom said...

Hilarious, I love it. What brand does "the nastiness" come in - I can't quite place it in my mental beverage aisle.

dave said...

The nastiness is "Clearly Canadian" and its ilk. Stocked in the seltzer aisle, pretending to be seltzer, you buy it thinking you've found an awesome new flavor of seltzer, and then BAM!! the nastiness! it's terribly artificially sweetened!

dave said...

The nastiness is even worse when it's the house brand "Safeway Select" or whatever - because then its even trickier to tell it isn't seltzer unless you actually read ingredients.

Disco Mom said...

Yes, rings a bell. The Walmart house brand is nastiness as well - and flat.

Shells said...

Thanks for the clarification. And clearly it is pop and not soda for me.

Maren said...

This is great. Thanks. I always liked Clearly Canadian because when I was in college it was the only interesting carbonated beverage around that came in unusual flavors like Loganberry. (Besides which I was in love with this guy from Logan who was in Canada at the time....)

Later, at Stanford, all campus gatherings that were going to serve alcoholic beverages were required to provide "EANABs", or "equally acceptable non-alcoholic beverages". I was often disappointed at the offerings, as you might imagine. Sometimes they were acceptable, but Sprite does not match up to micro-brewed pale ale or hard lemonade or such-like. I always appreciated it when someone went out of their way to make an effort in the EANAB selections. And I wasn't the only one- if they were good, they were usually as popular as the beer.

Just Katy said...

Looks right to me. I found my home county and it was right. Coke all the way. Coke = sprite, rootbear, ginger ale, Dr.Pepper, Pepsi etc etc etc.

Maren said...

Quinn liked your map a lot. He says it looks eerily similar to the national Republican/Democrat/Other Party map. If he had any free time these days (which he doesn't), he'd run some statistical models to see just HOW similar they are. Maybe I can get him to do it someday.

Tona said...

In New England it's often "tonic" as the generic term. Didn't see that on the map, so it must be a local term (or dying out).